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2019 THSOA Scholarships Recipients attend Multibeam Training Course

January 28, 2019 9:48 AM | Melissa Wood (Administrator)

 

 2019 THSOA Scholarships Recipients attend Multibeam Training Course

 

The Hydrographic Society of America (THSOA) and the organizers of the CCOM-UNH/OMG-UNB Multibeam Course sponsored two graduate students and one recent graduate to attend MBC77 held in New Orleans in January.

The recipients of the scholarships reflected the broad geographical coverage of THSOA; Mile Saunders from Oregon, Johnson Oguntuase from Mississippi, and Michael Espriella from Florida. They also have different academic background, including GIS and land surveying, remote sensing, GIS and habitat assessment. All three scholarship recipients acknowledged that the course added significantly to their seafloor mapping knowledge and provided a great basis for their ongoing multibeam related work.

Michael noted that it provided him with invaluable knowledge and experience for since he is at the start of using multibeam for habitat mapping. He was also surprised to learn of the variety of applications of multibeam data both from the lecturers as well as the attendees, as communicating with other students was one of the most beneficial aspects of the course: “Perhaps the best aspect of the course was the opportunity to learn from five different leaders in the field each with their own interests providing a variety of perspectives”.

Johnson is undertaking his PhD at USM and was pleased that the course strengthened his conceptual understanding of the physics applied in multibeam; especially, bottom detection and seafloor imaging techniques. “One major aspect of the course that is overly interesting to me is the dynamic error recognition and analysis … before attending this course, my skills on troubleshooting artifacts were simply subjective to guesses. I now have a firm grip on artifact diagnosing!”

Miles has a strong background in geo-spatial analysis and came to the course with deep-water multibeam and sub-bottom mapping experience from his time as a data acquisition technician on E/V Nautilus expeditions. He thought he understood the general principals that controlled these systems, but after the first several lectures, realized how incredibly complicated and intertwined multibeam systems are, and what is needed to properly integrate all the ancillary systems. “… without the THSOA scholarship I would not have been able to attend the MBC77 in New Orleans.  I know that this course will have a direct impact on how I will map and process data in the future.”

 

   Miles G. Saunders

The Multibeam Training Course scholarship was a fantastic opportunity to expand my  knowledge of principals and theories that govern multibeam sonar systems.  Before the course, I felt I understood the general principals that controlled these systems.  After the first several lectures, I realized how incredibly complicated and intertwined multibeam systems are, and what is needed to properly integrate all the ancillary systems.  The physics behind beam forming, both on transmit and receive arrays that allow sound to be accurately aimed has helped me to better understand how the magic of multibeam works.  The multiple lectures on side-lobe interference with various seafloor bathymetry, why there is side-lobe interference, what those look like in collected data will greatly improve the way I process data.  The structure of the lectures was designed to repeatedly discuss important characteristics of multibeam; each lecturer covered the important information from their area of expertise, overlapping and building on the other lectures.  I cannot recommend this course enough to anyone even tangentially involved with seafloor mapping.  The section on ancillary sensors, and the proper alignment of those sensors is knowledge that every person on board should understand.  So many systems work in tandem to achieve a truly amazing feat of science and engineering; without The Hydrographic Society’s scholarship I would not have been able to attend the MBC77 in New Orleans.  I know that this course will have a direct impact on how I will map and process data in the future.

 

   Michael C. Espriella

As a graduate student looking to establish myself in the field, the MBC training provided me with invaluable knowledge and resources. I was surprised to learn of the variety of applications of multibeam data both from the lecturers as well as the attendees, as communicating with other students was one of the most beneficial aspects of the course. As somebody who has spent more time interpreting multibeam data rather than setting systems up, the training allowed me to understand the whole process from system set up to the final product. 

From a habitat mapping perspective, I learned of sophisticated ways to visualize data and understand causes behind artefacts in the data. It was also beneficial to learn about future directions as work continues to improve the technology and find novel ways to best represent findings. Perhaps the best aspect of the course was the opportunity to learn from five different leaders in the field each with their own interests providing a variety of perspectives. 

 

   Johnson Oguntuase

It was a privilege to have been selected to attend the 77th Multibeam Sonar Training Course. I am indeed grateful to the leadership of THSOA for the scholarship award. Overall, the course has strengthened my conceptual understanding of the physics applied in multibeam; especially, button detection and seafloor imaging techniques. One major aspect of the course that is overly interesting to me is the dynamic error recognition and analysis. I learned the techniques for troubleshooting multibeam-data artifacts induced by system integration, refraction, and internal waves. Before attending this course, my skills on troubleshooting artifacts were simply subjective to guesses. I now have a firm grip on artifact diagnosing! The lessons learned are already being shared with some of my colleagues, working on multibeam projects at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM). Besides, the current CAT-A students will also benefit from the lessons learned as I assist two of our Professors during their bathymetry and kinematic lab classes. Finally, my effort to create an interactive educational tool, for a priori uncertainty estimations of various multibeam systems, will largely depend on the knowledge acquired during this course. Once, again, thanks to THSOA scholarship award.



The 77th UNB-OMG/UNH-CCOM Multibeam Sonar Training Course was held from January 7th thru the 12th, 2019 at the Bourbon Orleans Hotel. 

If you have questions regarding the Multibeam Sonar Training Course, please contact Lindsay Gee at mbcinfo@hydrometrica.com.

 

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